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The Validity and Reliability Study of the Turkish Version of Client Attachment to Therapist Scale (CATS)

Yasemin KAHYA, Nuray MUSTAFAOĞLU ÇİÇEK, F. Mahperi ULUYOL, Hüseyin NERGİZ, Sait ULUÇ, Gonca SOYGÜT PEKAK
2022 33(2): 97-107
DOI: 10.5080/u25582
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İNGİLİZCE ÖZET

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of
the Turkish version of Client Attachment to Therapist Scale (CATSTR)
which provides a framework for measuring and conceptualizing the
relationship between the therapist and the client.
Method: The study included 191 individuals with a mean age of
24.41 years who had received a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 15
sessions of therapy for different psychological problems. All participants
completed the CATS-TR, the Early Close Relationships-R (ECR-R),
the Bell Object Relations Inventory (BORRTI), and the Working
Alliance Inventory (WAI-SF), and a Client Information Form handed
to the clients in a closed envelope by their respective therapists.
Results: Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis results indicated
an acceptable fit for the CATS-TR which comprised the Secure,
Fearful/Avoidant and Preoccupied/Merger subscales, with internal
consistency levels ranging between 0.71 and 0.85. Criterion validity
analyses showed that the scores on the CATS-TR Fearful/Avoidant and
Preoccupied/Merger subscales correlated with the scores on the ECR-R
Avoidance/Anxiety subdimesnions and the BORRTI Object Relations
subdimension in the expected directions. Also, the mean score on the
CATS-TR Secure Attachment subscale was a significant predictor of the
therapeutic alliance assessed by the WAI-SF and its subscales.
Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that the CATS-TR has an
acceptable level of validity and reliability with results indicating its
usefulness for research and clinical settings in Turkey investigating the
common factors bringing about change in psychotherapy.
Keywords: Attachment to therapist, therapeutic alliance, measuring
attachment in psychotherapy